Doo-wop!


You and I react to calls like this, the ones embedded in the deep recesses of our mind. When recalled we respond with a programed response to do something. My friend, life’s a story, stayed tuned for more on This Passing Day.

I love Doo-wop music. A genre of music popular during the 1950s and 60s, it was a distinctive format which featured a high tenor singing the lead and a bass singer reciting the lyrics in the middle of the song. Doo-wop featured vocal group harmony, the critical nonsense syllables like “shoo-be-doo” or “doo-wah,” with a simple lyric and beat. Many of these songs have burrowed themselves into my mind so deeply that all it takes is a word or sound and I start Do-wopping my way through my day. What made this music so memorable? I believe it was, without a doubt, the Doo-wopping part that was key to memorability. There was a song in the early 1960s by a Doo-wop group whose name has now slipped from my memory. The bass part was a simple, nonsense lyric: “Memba, memba, rememba-memba” repeated over and over again. Take away the Doo-wop and the song was, perhaps, forgettable. With it, it became a brainworm, a call to sing it over and over again almost without the ability to stop.

You and I react to calls like this, the ones embedded in the deep recesses of our mind. When re-called we respond with a nearly programed response to do something. While simple on the one hand, it’s so very powerfully drawing on the other.