Where are you?

April 18, 2017

 

When trying to get somewhere spiritually are we so anxious to discover journey’s end that we overlook the obvious in favor of a goal more obscure than we think? My friend, life’s a story, stayed tuned for more on This Passing Day.

 

Getting lost is one of my greatest concerns in life. Year’s ago it was it was even more of a concern. There was no GPS, just an auto map with highways and towns. If you did get lost, however, there was always the service station you could pull into and ask directions. I recall a time years ago when I was headed to a place in an unfamiliar part of the city. I thought I had it pinpointed on the map, but was mistaken. I was lost. I pulled into a Gulf station along the highway and walked inside with my road map folded to the right part of the city where my destination was. The garage attendant listened to me intently as I told him where I wanted to go. Wiping his hands on an oily rag, he looked at the map and after a moment or two looked up at me and asked me if I knew where I was? He unfolded the map to another quadrant altogether. I squinted and looked at him and said, “Of course–I’m here!” He said, “You’re nowhere near where you want to be. Here, let me show you on the map where you really are.” 

 

When we’re trying to get somewhere spiritually are we often guilty of the same thing; so anxious to discover journey’s end that we overlook the obvious in favor of a goal that may be more obscure than we think?    

 

Here’s a story. A brochure put out several years ago by the Durham, N.C., County Public Library explained the use of the card catalogue, acknowledging that this can be mystifying at times. The reason the brochure was deemed necessary is that a situation had occurred when a librarian spotted a young man standing outside the entry way of the library in an agitated state. When she finally walked up to the young man in an effort to discover the reason he seemed so disturbed he told her that he had been waiting for someone to come and help him. It seems that he had been using the card catalogue and the instruction on the computer came up with the direction to “See Main Entry.” Upon reading “See Main Entry” he went out to the front steps of the library and dutifully waited for help. The library subsequently published a brochure to deter any future directionally challenged patrons from seeking assistance in the Main Entry.  (Durham, N.C. Herald.)

 

Exodus 3:4 relates the story of Moses and the burning bush. Scripture states, “When the Lord saw that he (Moses) had gone over to look, God called to him from within the bush, ‘Moses! Moses!’ And Moses said, “Here I am.’” When God calls to us, the question is, like that gas station attendant, “Do we know where we are?” I thought I knew where I was. That young man standing on the steps of the library thought so as well. Neither he nor I were where we needed to be. We were both in the wrong spot. We anticipated an outcome, but that outcome kept us from really knowing where we needed to be. Moses was somewhere when God called him as he was ready to obey and go. It’s easy to live our lives in a fog of anticipation, always assuming that we know where we need to be. Sometimes it’s just better to listen for God’s call, whether that be a call to something big or small, and abide where we are in a state of being ready but not anticipation. We’ll get to where God wants us to go much easier when we let him lead and we follow. “Here I am” is always a better response than “Where do you want me to be?”  

 

We pray. Thank you Lord for keeping us in your plans to the important work that needs to be done here on earth for the Kingdom. We live in anticipation of many things in life; that’s the way we are. Often, though, this keeps us from being where you want us to be when you call. Forgive us when try to out-think you. How foolish and sinful that is. Bless us with a sense of readiness that keeps us looking heavenward and not forward. In Jesus name we pray. Amen!

 

“Therefore do not worry about tomorrow, for tomorrow will worry about itself. Each day has enough trouble of its own” (Matt 6:34)

 

Thank you for tuning into This Passing Day. Join us at thispassingday.com. May this PASSING day honor our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ and be a blessing to you and everyone you meet. Find a stranger and say hello. Don’t let another day pass without your day blessing someone else’s.

 

If you have a special prayer request, please send your request to “This Passing Day!”  <mark@thispassingday.com>. God bless you for Jesus sake>

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