Little calamities


Life is full of two types of calamities: major and minor. The major ones, easier to spot, are the ones we are most likely to both anticipate and endure. My friend, life’s a story, stayed tuned for more on This Passing Day.

Holly and I recently purchased a set of kitchen chairs. Our old chairs had begun to wobble and creak. They were nicked and scratched after several decades of kitchen use. It was time. We went to a local furniture store known for its high quality, Amish-made furniture. In fact they have an Amish buggy out in front of their store promoting their Amish offerings. We were looking for chairs that would last for many years, so when our chairs were delivered and we were delighted. I was able to sit in them for hours instead of minutes. Everything about the chairs said quality. The cushion and fabric were durable and frames were made from hardwood. The chairs were pegged and glued. Even the rollers were top-notch. Unfortunately after a couple of weeks two of the chairs began to pull apart where the arms connected to the backs. I inspected the chairs closely and found that one of the chairs was pegged and glued at this point, but three were not. That one little detail, a small peg missing where there should have been one, made all the difference. The major detail work on the chairs was superb; it was the minor details that made three of the chairs deficient.

Life is full of two types of calamities: major and minor. The major ones, easier to spot, are the ones we are most likely to both anticipate and endure. It’s the minor issues that are easily overlooked.