'Wanna Be's?

January 12, 2018

 

 

My friend, may I ask you a question? Is there any more important moment in the life of a Christian than when he is called into the Lord’s service? As with life’s successes, however, how apparent is the moment of your calling?

 

My friend, life's a story, welcome to This Passing Day. I'm Mark Brunner.

 

 

“When did you first know what you wanted to be in life?” You may have been asked this question at some point in your life. If it hadn’t been asked whimsically as one who asks a child, it’s an uncommon question that most likely would never be asked unless, of course, one had achieved some level of expertise in something that impressed someone enough to ask it? Another characteristic of the question is that it’s seldom asked of someone who has achieved success in the mundane or the commonplace; unless, of course, it’s delivered as sarcasm. “When did you know that your life’s work would be commuting to an office job along with hundreds of others laboring in similar cubicles with a computer screen plunked in front of your face?” Doubtless that question would be the result of someone who didn’t much like you or, even worse, disliked your occupation as well and pretty much everything about you. If most were honest in answering the question without pride getting in the way, doubtless they really wouldn’t know the exact moment in time at the beginning of their road to success without fudging it a bit. That’s the nature of most of life’s directional moments; happenings usually begin without much in the way of fanfare. 

 

Is there any more important moment in the life of a Christian than when he is called into the Lord’s service? Likely not. It’s certainly one of the most successful moments in Christian life. As with life’s successes, however, how apparent is the moment of your calling? 

 

Here’s a thought from author Jamie Buckingham upon a visit to a dam on the Columbia River. “I’d always thought that the water spilling over the top provided the power, not realizing that it was just froth, that deep within turbines and generators transformed the power of tons and tons of water to electricity–quietly, without notice, not like the flashy froth on top.” (Source Unknown.)

 

The Apostle Paul wrote to the Corinthians. “For when I preach the gospel, I cannot boast, since I am compelled to preach. Woe to me if I do not preach the gospel” (1 Corinthians 9:16)! These are the words of a man, called by God to preach without any reference to pride or decision. Whereas he would always remember the moment of his conversion on the Road to Damascus, the calling was supernatural just as sure as his response to the calling was naturally obedient. The appearance of Christ was the froth as sure as the calling was the working of the Holy Spirit deep within. So, when did you know what God wanted you to be? Likely it was a subtle movement or change in the way you led your life since that’s the way the Spirit usually works. There is little of froth in the calling and much of hidden power of the Spirit within it.

 

We pray. Heavenly Father, thank you for calling us into the ministry of telling others about Jesus. Forgive us Lord when we put flattering ourselves in the knowledge that your call to us just at this certain time, thereby reflecting its importance and weight on us and not on your Holy Spirit. What matters is that you work in us despite us and not because of us. In Jesus name we pray. Amen! 

 

Therefore my friend, do not worry about tomorrow, for tomorrow will worry for itself; each day has enough trouble of its own. (Matt 6:34) This Passing Day. May this passing day honor our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ and be a blessing to you and everyone you meet. Find a stranger and say hello. Don't let another day pass without your day blessing someone else.

 

If you have a special prayer request, please send your request to "This Passing Day!"  <markcbrunner@thispassingday.com>  God bless   you for Jesus sake.

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