Snooze, you lose?


My friend, may I ask you a question? In this “can’t loose culture” is it the gambling or the busyness it promotes, or is it the “can’t wait” attitude that we tend to take with each other and just about everyone who doesn’t live up to our “overly expectant” attitude about being right.?

My friend, life’s a story, welcome to This Passing Day. I’m Mark Brunner.


We live in a society that doesn’t wait for anyone or anything. We’ve all seen it; even in ourselves. A cell phone malfunctions for a moment and the user is yelling at it, even shaking it. We want what we want now. Gone are the days when people had no other choice than waiting for the operator to place their long-distance phone call or for the Late News weather forecast to know what the weather would be like tomorrow. In our cultural climate of instant gratification, waiting has become difficult, and when people don’t get what they want, the psycho-logical reactions are anxious. The phrase “You snooze, you loose!”, once meant as a challenge to the aspiring, has now become more of an epitaph for those unfortunate enough to lag behind. I was listening to one of those radio commercials promoting a lottery game recently. The message was clear and plain. “You needed to play now to be a winner. Hesitate, you lose.”

The real unfortunate thing about this “can’t loose culture” isn’t so much the gambling or the busyness it promotes; it’s the “can’t wait” attitude that we tend to take with each other and just about everyone who doesn’t live up to our “overly expectant” attitude about being right.

Here’s a story from Grace Davis: Late one night I sat in the waiting room of a bus depot with a tired-looking little grandmother sitting hunched on the other end of the bench from me. A high school age boy sat on a bench across the room from us. Because of crimes committed in this city recently by teenage boys, I found myself glancing at him as he was watching the little grandmother quite intently. He took out his billfold and examined its contents. His eyes shifted to the elderly lady’s hands folded in her lap, to her neglected purse beside her, and back again to her hands. When he stood up, my heart began to pound. By now my full attention centered upon him. As he walked toward the sleeping woman, I prepared to spring into action should his hand reach for her purse. He stood above the little woman, hesitating for an instant, his right fist closed. Then, lowering his hand, he slowly opened his fist, and a bill dropped into the cup formed by wrinkled hands on a worn gray coat. And, it was not the one-dollar bill; it was the five. (Grace Shultz Davis)

We often leap to conclusions about others simply because we aren’t willing to take a “wait-see” attitude about what might be new or strange to us. “Wait and see” was a phrase I often heard growing up. Adults knew the importance of time when it came to making good judgments. That’s rare in the impatient world we live in today. The tragedy is that God often uses those “wait and see” opportunities to teach us valuable lessons about grace and mercy. In that case “a little snooze” may may not be a “you lose” situation at all.

We pray. Heavenly Father, bring me back to those days when I hungered for your plans and was patient in waiting for your grace. Forgive me when I treat life’s waiting moments as curses instead of the blessings they are. Give me the patience to linger in your presence. Pause my racing thoughts and self-imposed time limits. Thank you for being the only one who can truly take away my urge to do life by myself. Thank you for showing me that putting you first is what’s best for me. In Jesus name we pray. Amen! (https://www.crosswalk.com/faith/prayer/prayers/10-prayers-for-patience.html–adalpted)

Therefore my friend, do not worry about tomorrow, for tomorrow will worry for itself; each day has enough trouble of its own. (Matt 6:34) This Passing Day. May this passing day honor our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ and be a blessing to you and everyone you meet. Find a stranger and say hello. Don't let another day pass without your day blessing someone else.

If you have a special prayer request, please send your request to "This Passing Day!"

<markcbrunner@thispassingday.com> From Beech Springs, God bless you for Jesus sake.

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