Sincerity?

January 10, 2019

 

My friend, may I ask you a question? Is it possible for little cracks lead to big breaks? And, what happens when big breaks lead to big problems? If you don’t see the warning signs in the first place, can those little cracks become something hard to cope with altogether?

My friend, life’s a story, welcome to This Passing Day. I’m Mark Brunner.


I bought a box of wood screws recently. The box was plastic-wrapped, so there was no way to really inspect them. I took the screws home and, drill to screw head, began turning in the first screw. After only a few turns the screw snapped halfway down its shank. The next two screws did the same thing. Finally, I dumped the contents of the entire box out on the counter. It seems that every screw in the box had a small, hairline crack just under the head. It was the smallest of cracks. But, when put under stress, that crack might as well have been the Grand Canyon.

Is it possible for little cracks lead to big breaks? And, what happens when big breaks lead to big problems? If you don’t see the warning signs in the first place, can those little cracks become something hard to cope with altogether?
 

 


Here’s a story: The word “sincere” comes from two Latin words meaning “without wax.” Centuries ago, artisans of Middle Eastern countries fashioned highly expensive statuettes out of a very fine porcelain. It was of such fragile nature that extreme care had to be taken when firing the figurines to keep them from cracking. This wasn’t always possible and statuettes with slight cracks were often set aside to be sold to dealers not that interested in top quality. Some dishonest dealers would accept the cracked figurines at a much lower price and then fill the cracks with wax before offering them for sale. Buyers had to be very careful when inspecting their potential purchases; looking for tell-tale signs of “waxing.” Honest merchants, however, would display their uncracked porcelain wares with signs that read, “sine cera,” “without wax.” (George M. Bowman, [Chicago: Moody Press, How to Succeed With Your Money, 1974]).

The Apostle Paul writes in Romans, “Hate what is evil, cling to what is good” (Romans 12:9). In a very real sense, that’s what those “sincere” dealers were doing. Even the smallest of cracks, one that might never be discovered and did nothing to detract from the beauty of the ceramic piece, had to be hated. Why? Because those dealers loved what is good and had no tolerance for the imperfect. A buyer of a cracked vase or statute could live with it perfectly well for a time. But, small flaws, invariably lead to larger ones and, in the end, breakage. It’s like that with you and I. Like those cracked screws, we’re fine as long as life’s pressures don’t bear down on us. But, under stress, little cracks lead to big failures. May God find you and I this day sincere, without flaws; so that when troubles do come, we will bear up when others crumble.  

We pray: Heavenly Father. teach me to pray and live my life with sincerity! Work with my heart that I might understand. Work with my head, that my mind and body might be one. Work with my tongue, that the words of my mouth and the meditation of my heart might be acceptable to you. Reassure me that you hear every prayer and are acquainted with my every groan – that prayer is not judged by the eloquence of words, but the truthfulness of the heart. Help me to rise above the temptation to display my spirituality through meaninglessness long-winded speeches Grant me a sincere faith and a genuine hope and love. In Jesus' name, Amen."

Therefore my friend, do not worry about tomorrow, for tomorrow will worry for itself; each day has enough trouble of its own. (Matt 6:34) This Passing Day. May this passing day honor our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ and be a blessing to you and everyone you meet. Find a stranger and say hello. Don't let another day pass without your day blessing someone else.

If you have a special prayer request, please send your request to ”This Passing Day!”

<markcbrunner@thispassingday.com> From Beech Springs, God bless you for Jesus sake.

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