Banking time?


My friend, may I ask you a question? How does God want us to understand time? Is it a commodity we can manage or something we can only value and hold in great esteem?

My friend, life's a story, welcome to This Passing Day. I'm Mark Brunner.

Can you bank time? I've heard people tell me that they can. For example, the other day my son Dan told me that he was going to bed early since he had been up late the previous night. "I'm making up the time Dad," he said. I thought to myself as he went to his bedroom how odd that statement really was. The sleeping time Dan had spent yesterday was a deposit on yesterday and not today. What an odd way of looking at time when you think of it. It reminded me of something the humorist Dave Barry wrote years ago, "Aside from Velcro, time is the most mysterious substance in the universe. You can't see it or touch it, yet a plumber can charge you $75 an hour for it, without necessarily fixing anything." Yes, time is hard to grasp isn't it. But that doesn't stop young people from borrowing on it or old people from trying to buy it back.

How does God want us to understand time? Is it a commodity we can manage or something we can only value and hold in great esteem?

Here's a thought I pulled out of an investment periodical recently: "Imagine there is a bank that credits your account each morning with $86,400. Every morning of every day you wake up with a balance of exactly $86,400 in your account. Imagine something else about this account, though. It is the nature of the account that it carries over no balance from day to day. At the end of the day when your eyes close in sleep the bank deletes the entire unused balance. No matter how hard you try to spend the money, every evening the bank deletes whatever part of the balance you failed to use during the day. A problem you'd like to have? Perhaps. What would you do, though? Draw out every cent, of course and open another bank account! (Author unknown.)