The next mile?

My friend, may I ask you a question? Do you have “today’s” you’d rather get rid of? Is there any hope for tomorrow when today just isn’t much fun? Is it hard to be persistent about a bright tomorrow when that persistence is dependent upon getting through a pretty gloomy day?

My friend, life’s a story, welcome to This Passing Day. I'm Mark Brunner.

There’s an old, Danish fur trapper’s principle that is a sticky note stuck to the side of my computer monitor: “The next mile is the only one a person really has to make.” For me, someone who is always looking down the road and measuring the load, this little bit of wisdom has paid off time and time again. If I am able to train myself to focus only on the next mile of work and accomplishment, the mile after that moves to the front, and the mile after that. I keep moving and the work keeps getting done. If I look too far ahead, I get myself in trouble. There’s just something about today bumping into tomorrow that doesn’t make sense. We need to keep today intact if we ever want to see tomorrow come.

But, what about those “today’s” we’d rather get rid of? Is there any hope for tomorrow when today just isn’t much fun?

Here’s a story: For more than twenty years Robert Frost was a failure. He often said that during this time he was one of the very few persons who knew he was a poet. At his death, the world mourned his passing, and today he towers as one of America’s greatest verse writers. His poems have been published in twenty-two languages, with his American edition alone selling over a record one million copies. He was a four-time winner of the coveted Pulitzer Prize for poetry and had more honorary degrees thrust upon him than probably any other man of letters. Robert Frost was thirty-nine before he ever sold a volume of poetry. He had been writing for twenty years and received endless rejection slips. However, his perseverance paid off and the world is wiser and richer for it. (selected)

It’s hard to be persistent about a bright tomorrow when that persistence is dependent upon getting through a pretty gloomy day. When we’re burdened by the sorrows and cares of life, looking ahead can sometimes be discouraging, even fearful. I’m reminded of the story in the Bible where the two blind men followed Jesus, crying out after Him to cure them. When it seemed that they were not heard, they cried all the louder and followed all the closer (Matthew 9:27-31). But, because they believed in what Jesus could do today, they were persistent about what their tomorrow’s would look like. They went after Jesus and wouldn’t let go knowing that the “next mile was the only one they needed to worry about.”

We pray. Lord, give us the strength to stick it out over the long haul—not the grim strength of gritting our teeth but the glory-strength you give us. It is strength that endures the unendurable and spills over into joy, thanking you Father for making us strong enough to take part in everything bright and beautiful that You have for us. Jesus, give us the strength in our weaknesses. In Jesus' name we pray, Amen.

Therefore my friend, do not worry about tomorrow, for tomorrow will worry for itself; each day has enough trouble of its own. (Matt 6:34) This Passing Day. May this passing day honor our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ and be a blessing to you and everyone you meet. Find a stranger and say hello. Don't let another day pass without your day blessing someone else.

If you have a special prayer request, please send your request to ”This Passing Day!”

<markcbrunner@thispassingday.com> From Beech Springs, God bless you for Jesus sake.

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