How ironic?

August 22, 2019

 

My friend, may I ask you a question? Can overconfidence, coupled with negligence, lead to sad consequences at times? Doesn’t it seem that it is the case when a person is so sure of himself that he becomes careless about little things that may pose a threat?

 

Life’s a story, welcome to This Passing Day. I'm Mark Brunner.

 

 

 

I’m always lifting things that I shouldn’t lift. If my wife needs a chair moved from one side of the room to the other, I’m right there lifting it even though she has offered to help. Last weekend I cleaned out the back garage where we keep the lawn and garden equipment. The leaf vacuum is one of the heavy pieces of equipment, along with the log splitter, that we store back there. Instead of waiting for my son to get home from work, I tried pulling them in and out of the garage by myself. I made it, but not without suffering the consequences. I spent Saturday night with icepacks on both of my ailing knees. It was a job that really required less self-confidence and a little more common sense. 

 

Over confidence, coupled with negligence, can lead to sad consequences. This is the case when a person is so sure of himself that he becomes careless about little things that may pose a threat.

 

Here’s a story: In 1911, a stuntman named Bobby Leach, went over Niagara Falls in a specially designed steel drum and lived to tell about it. Although he suffered minor injuries, he survived because he recognized the tremendous dangers involved in the feat, and because he had done everything he could to protect himself from harm.Several years after that incident, while skipping down the street in New Zealand, Bobby Leach slipped on an orange peeling, fell, and badly fractured his leg. He was taken to a hospital where he later died of complications from that fall. He received a greater injury walking down the street than he sustained in going over Niagara Falls. He was not prepared for danger in what he assumed to be a safe situation. (Source Unknown.) 

 

Self-sufficiency is any enemy when it causes us to believe that we can always do what needs to be done in our own strength. When we tackle life’s problems with an air of self-worth and not a worth derived from our relationship with God, we often find ourselves in situations that are hard to get out of. Living by our own strength is dangerous. Living by the strength that we find in Christ, is far better. When we recognize that we can do all things in Christ, we will find our- selves prepared for anything that life can throw at us; whether that be Niagara Falls or simply an orange peel. 

 

"Therefore do not worry about tomorrow, for tomorrow will worry about itself. Each day has enough trouble of its own" (Matt 6:34) 

 

We pray. Dear Lord. You warn us against the dangers of overconfidence in our lives; of placing our hopes on ourselves and our own abilities. You call us to be humble; to be people of prayer, constantly seeking You, trusting in You, and not ourselves. Help us Lord to make sure that we commit our ways to you. May we never lean on our own understanding, always asking for your guidance. Forgive us when we take sin in our lives for granted taking no care for the small sins that eat away at our lives. All sins are deadly, especially when we least expect to fall. May we humble ourselves before You always and obey Your Word in total obedience. In Jesus name. Amen!

 

Therefore my friend, do not worry about tomorrow, for tomorrow will worry for itself; each day has enough trouble of its own. (Matt 6:34) This Passing Day. May this passing day honor our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ and be a blessing to you and everyone you meet. Find a stranger and say hello. Don't let another day pass without your day blessing someone else.

 

If you have a special prayer request, please send your request to ”This Passing Day!” 

 

<markcbrunner@thispassingday.com> From Beech Springs, God bless you for Jesus sake.

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