Loaded words?


My friend, may I ask you a question? Do we often accidentally fire an explosive word that hits something other than the target we’re aiming for? Could the consequences sometimes be devastating, yet not always noticeable?

My friend, life’s a story, welcome to This Passing Day. I’m M. Clifford Brunner?

Paper wasps build beautiful nests sometimes reaching several feet in diameter and in length. They make a great places to raise wasp larva, usually hanging high up on barn eaves or from a tree limb. They also make great targets for little boys just curious enough to see what might happen if a rock is tossed into and through the nest. There’s just something about a hanging, paper ball that invites the risk. I can still remember the feeling of spotting one of these fragile ornaments hang- ing from an overhead tree limb. Rock in hand–little separated me from making that throw. However, the thought of being chased by a band of angry wasps was usually enough to make me drop the rock before making the throw.

When it comes to choosing our words, especially when we’re angry, sometimes it’s just best to never fire them off.

Here’s a story: September 25, 1906 the steamboat Columbian was heading down river towards Dawson with her usual complement of cargo and passengers. Among the cargo was a load of explosives to be used in the mines. One of the passengers aboard the Columbian that day accidentally fired a shotgun blast into a barrel of dynamite. The story goes that he was shooting at wild ducks on the river and his shot went wild. Whatever the reason, putting a shotgun blast into a barrel of dynamite is never a good idea, and it caused a colossal explosion that resulted in the deaths of five passengers and the total destruction of the Columbian. The Colombian had been a ship with a promising future, but her future was complete- ly ruined by the single shot of a gun! (Rob Chaffart)

The same is true with the words we use. We often accidentally fire an explosive word that hits something other than the target we’re aiming for. The consequences are always devastating, although unlike the explosion on the Columbian, not always noticeable. No wonder the Bible warns us to put a watch over our mouths against explosive words when it says that we “Should be quick to listen, slow to speak and slow to become angry, for a man’s anger does not bring about the righteous life that God desires” (James 1:19-21). Each of us needs to examine what sort of emotional shotgun we’re carrying around. If it’s loaded perhaps it’s time to remove the ammunition.

We pray. Heavenly Father. We often accidentally fire an explosive word that hits something other than the target we’re aiming for. The consequences Lord are always devastating, yet not always noticeable. You warns us in Your Word to put a watch over our mouths against explosive words. Your tells us that we “Should be quick to listen, slow to speak and slow to become angry, for a man’s anger does not bring about the righteous life that God desires” (James 1:19-21). Forgive us Lord when we do not guard our words and end up hurting those we love. Help us to examine what sort of emotional shotgun we’re carrying around. If it’s loaded perhaps it’s time for each of us to remove the ammunition. In Jesus name we pray. Amen!

Therefore my friend, do not worry about tomorrow, for tomorrow will worry for itself; each day has enough trouble of its own. (Matt 6:34) This Passing Day. May this passing day honor our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ and be a blessing to you and everyone you meet. Find a stranger and say hello. Don't let another day pass without your day blessing someone else.

If you have a special prayer request, please send your request to "This Passing Day!"

<thispassingday@gmail.com> From Beech Springs, God bless you for Jesus sake.

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