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A beautiful blessing?



A beautiful blessing? An old advertisement years ago showed graphic images of children suffering from cleft palates in poverty-stricken nations. When these commercials aired I usually muted them and averted my eyes, there came an instance however when I hesitated and watched. Amazingly, my repulsion receded, and my aversion turned into compassion.


Think about it. There are people out there who need our help. It can’t be covered-up or avoided; because we have to own-up to our responsibility of being compassionate.


God’s Word tells us: “First images can be compelling, but when we fail to take-in the entire message, they can also be deceiving. (1 John 1:9).”


God calls us to identify with the poor and not ignore them. This is the first step in developing a compassionate, Christian character. We need to open our eyes and step out of our safe zones, understanding that first impressions can change. When we need to see beyond what isn’t pretty to someone who needs our help, we too can transform our initial aversion into a beautiful lasting compassion; truly seeing those less fortunate around us. What a beautiful blessing.


We pray: “Heavenly Father, I confess my sins before You. Thank You for Your promise to forgive and purify me. Help me to embrace confession, trusting in Your faithfulness and justice. Strengthen me to face the cost of honesty, knowing Your grace restores my relationship with You. In Jesus Christ name. Amen.”


“Therefore do not worry about tomorrow, for tomorrow will worry about itself.

Each day has enough trouble of its own” (Matthew 6:34)

Comments


A beautiful blessing?



A beautiful blessing? An old advertisement years ago showed graphic images of children suffering from cleft palates in poverty-stricken nations. When these commercials aired I usually muted them and averted my eyes, there came an instance however when I hesitated and watched. Amazingly, my repulsion receded, and my aversion turned into compassion.


Think about it. There are people out there who need our help. It can’t be covered-up or avoided; because we have to own-up to our responsibility of being compassionate.


God’s Word tells us: “First images can be compelling, but when we fail to take-in the entire message, they can also be deceiving. (1 John 1:9).”


God calls us to identify with the poor and not ignore them. This is the first step in developing a compassionate, Christian character. We need to open our eyes and step out of our safe zones, understanding that first impressions can change. When we need to see beyond what isn’t pretty to someone who needs our help, we too can transform our initial aversion into a beautiful lasting compassion; truly seeing those less fortunate around us. What a beautiful blessing.


We pray: “Heavenly Father, I confess my sins before You. Thank You for Your promise to forgive and purify me. Help me to embrace confession, trusting in Your faithfulness and justice. Strengthen me to face the cost of honesty, knowing Your grace restores my relationship with You. In Jesus Christ name. Amen.”


“Therefore do not worry about tomorrow, for tomorrow will worry about itself.

Each day has enough trouble of its own” (Matthew 6:34)

Comments


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