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Footsteps?

(01-10-22)– Let It Shine! –Titus 2:7)


My friend, may I ask you a question? Does the path we leave behind with our character-building footsteps provide a path for others, those who look up to us, to follow behind, secure in what we have done and what they also would like to do?

My friend, Life’s a story, welcome to This Passing Day.

I'm M. Clifford Brunner.



It's been said that to make a positive impact on those we meet along life's road: "It's not what we eat but what we digest that makes us strong; Not what we gain but what we save that makes us rich; not what we read but what we remember that makes us learned; not what we preach but what we practice that makes us Christians. (Source Unknown.) Putting our best foot forward is a win-win situation. For you and I it builds character and makes our faith-light shine brighter and brighter. But the path we leave behind with those character-building footsteps does something else; it provides a path for others, those who look up to us, to follow behind, secure in what we have done and what they also would like to do.


Here's a story: Matty Lovo is only nine years old. His father drives a big semi-trailer truck that was recently pulling two trailers loaded with lumber. Matty was riding in the cab, enjoying the ride, proud to be with his dad. Then the unexpected happened. His Dad had a seizure and lost consciousness, and the truck veered into oncoming traffic and struck a utility pole. Matthew didn't panic; he did what he had to do. He climbed across his dad and into the driver's seat and steered the big truck back into its lanes. He got on the truck's C.B. radio to call for help. Somebody heard his plea for help and told him to turn off the ignition key. The rig began to slow down. A passing motorist stopped his car, jumped out, and chased down the truck on foot. He jumped aboard, climbed into the cab with Matty, and applied the brakes that a nine-year-old boy's legs could not reach while steering. Matty later said. "I thought, I should just do what my Dad does." He did. Matty had been watching his Dad's every move driving that truck and it paid off for both of them. (Author unknown. If anyone has a proprietary interest in this story please authenticate and I will be happy to credit, or remove, as the circumstances dictate.)

All of us ought to think about this father-son story very deeply. Our children watch. They absorb. They take their cues about how to react to crises and joys, family and friends, God and man. They look to see where we are walking and they look to fit their feet into our footsteps. You've heard all your life about how more lessons are caught than taught, haven't you? It is true! "I should just do what my Dad does," thought little Matty. And it served him well on that day to remember and imitate his father's habits in driving a truck. Perhaps today would be a good day to stop and examine the footsteps you are leaving for your children, or anyone who might be following in your path. If it won't do to have them do what you're doing today, maybe it isn't too late. If your best foot isn't leading you down the right path, back up. Someone else is waiting to fill your footsteps.


We pray. Heavenly Father, today would be a good day to stop and examine our footsteps, the ones we are leaving behind for those who follow us, or anyone who might be following in our path in this life. If it won't do to have them do what we are doing today, maybe it isn't too late for us to change the path of our footsteps. If our best foot isn't leading us down the right path, we need to back up. Someone else is waiting to fill your footsteps. Make us mindful of what we are doing and who is following in our footsteps. In Jesus name we pray. Amen!


Therefore my friend, do not worry about tomorrow, for tomorrow will worry for itself; each day has enough trouble of its own. (Matt 6:34) This Passing Day. May this passing day honor our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ and be a blessing to you and everyone you meet. Find a stranger and say hello. Don't let another day pass without your day blessing someone else.

If you have a special prayer request, please send your request to ”This Passing Day!”


<thispassingday@gmail.com> From Beech Springs, God bless you for Jesus sake.

Comments


Footsteps?

(01-10-22)– Let It Shine! –Titus 2:7)


My friend, may I ask you a question? Does the path we leave behind with our character-building footsteps provide a path for others, those who look up to us, to follow behind, secure in what we have done and what they also would like to do?

My friend, Life’s a story, welcome to This Passing Day.

I'm M. Clifford Brunner.



It's been said that to make a positive impact on those we meet along life's road: "It's not what we eat but what we digest that makes us strong; Not what we gain but what we save that makes us rich; not what we read but what we remember that makes us learned; not what we preach but what we practice that makes us Christians. (Source Unknown.) Putting our best foot forward is a win-win situation. For you and I it builds character and makes our faith-light shine brighter and brighter. But the path we leave behind with those character-building footsteps does something else; it provides a path for others, those who look up to us, to follow behind, secure in what we have done and what they also would like to do.


Here's a story: Matty Lovo is only nine years old. His father drives a big semi-trailer truck that was recently pulling two trailers loaded with lumber. Matty was riding in the cab, enjoying the ride, proud to be with his dad. Then the unexpected happened. His Dad had a seizure and lost consciousness, and the truck veered into oncoming traffic and struck a utility pole. Matthew didn't panic; he did what he had to do. He climbed across his dad and into the driver's seat and steered the big truck back into its lanes. He got on the truck's C.B. radio to call for help. Somebody heard his plea for help and told him to turn off the ignition key. The rig began to slow down. A passing motorist stopped his car, jumped out, and chased down the truck on foot. He jumped aboard, climbed into the cab with Matty, and applied the brakes that a nine-year-old boy's legs could not reach while steering. Matty later said. "I thought, I should just do what my Dad does." He did. Matty had been watching his Dad's every move driving that truck and it paid off for both of them. (Author unknown. If anyone has a proprietary interest in this story please authenticate and I will be happy to credit, or remove, as the circumstances dictate.)

All of us ought to think about this father-son story very deeply. Our children watch. They absorb. They take their cues about how to react to crises and joys, family and friends, God and man. They look to see where we are walking and they look to fit their feet into our footsteps. You've heard all your life about how more lessons are caught than taught, haven't you? It is true! "I should just do what my Dad does," thought little Matty. And it served him well on that day to remember and imitate his father's habits in driving a truck. Perhaps today would be a good day to stop and examine the footsteps you are leaving for your children, or anyone who might be following in your path. If it won't do to have them do what you're doing today, maybe it isn't too late. If your best foot isn't leading you down the right path, back up. Someone else is waiting to fill your footsteps.


We pray. Heavenly Father, today would be a good day to stop and examine our footsteps, the ones we are leaving behind for those who follow us, or anyone who might be following in our path in this life. If it won't do to have them do what we are doing today, maybe it isn't too late for us to change the path of our footsteps. If our best foot isn't leading us down the right path, we need to back up. Someone else is waiting to fill your footsteps. Make us mindful of what we are doing and who is following in our footsteps. In Jesus name we pray. Amen!


Therefore my friend, do not worry about tomorrow, for tomorrow will worry for itself; each day has enough trouble of its own. (Matt 6:34) This Passing Day. May this passing day honor our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ and be a blessing to you and everyone you meet. Find a stranger and say hello. Don't let another day pass without your day blessing someone else.

If you have a special prayer request, please send your request to ”This Passing Day!”


<thispassingday@gmail.com> From Beech Springs, God bless you for Jesus sake.

Comments


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