Heavyweight?

11.24.20—-Let God Do It!--Ephesians 4:32


My friend, may I ask you a question? You and I need to examine our grudges and do what armies do when hostilities are over: unload the cannonballs and stack them on the courthouse lawn; then can we marvel at how much easier it is to get around?


My friend, life’s a story, welcome to This Passing Day.

I’m M. Clifford Brunner?





Dogs and bees–I’ve long wondered why dogs react so differently to bees than we humans do. If a bee darts out after us or begins to circle our head we’re swatting and off and running at the same time. Just the thought that the little Kamikaze could actually carry through with his threat and sting us is enough to make most people flee before deciding how real the threat might be. But, dogs are different. I recently watched Frodo, one of our miniature Dachshunds, leap on an unsuspecting wasp that just happened to cross his path. Of course, the wasp went for the sting pretty quickly. But Frodo, whether out of bravery or ignorance, recoiled and jumped into the fray again. The odds of getting stung twice, should that wasp have retained his stinger, were pretty high. That, however, didn’t seem to bother Frodo. He was more interested in standing his ground than how many times he might get stung.


When you think about it, carrying a grudge, is just about as foolish as allowing the same bee to sting you twice.

Here’s a thought: Once armies carried cannonballs with them, afraid they would meet the enemy somewhere and have nothing to shoot at it. Some have estimated that during the course of the Civil War both Southern and Northern armies employed over 60,000 mules and horses devoted solely to pulling caissons in which the cannon balls were normally carried. These caissons were heavy, sometimes weighing, fully loaded, over a ton. Calculating the cost of feed, maintenance and other husbandry costs, just taking care of the vast army of mules and horses designated to tote this tonnage may have totaled close to fully 15% of the total war expense on either side. While cannon balls were indispensable in the heat of battle, fully 96% of the time these were in caissons in transport from one point to another, and not in the heat of battle. Armies were oftentimes slowed down so terribly by the cartage of cannon balls that some generals were often tempted to go into battle without them, relying on speed and surprise rather than explosive force. (Source Unknown)


James Thom writes: “Grudges are like cannonballs. It makes little sense to carry them. Most likely, the “enemy” is unaware of your anger and surely would be surprised to learn that you’ve been stalking him with a cannonball in your pocket.” The Bible tells us to “Be kind and compassionate with one another”(Ephesians 4:32). You and I need to examine our grudges and do what armies do when hostilities are over: unload the cannonballs and stack them on the courthouse lawn; then marvel at how much easier it is to get around. We can go through life attacking the things that sting us like Frodo; or we can flee from the sting to love another day. One is painful over and over, the other painful but once.

We pray. Heavenly Father. “Grudges are really like cannonballs. O Lord, it makes little sense to carry them. Most likely, the “enemy” is unaware of our anger and would be surprised to learn that we’ve been stalking him with a cannonball in our pocket.”You tell us in Your Word to “Be kind and compassionate with one another.” We need to examine our grudges and do what armies do when hostilities are over: unload the cannonballs and stack them on the courthouse lawn; then marvel at how much easier it is to get around. Forgive us Lord when we don’t and choose to carry them instead. We can go through life attacking the things that sting us; or we can flee from the sting to love another day. One is painful over and over, the other painful but once. We pray this in Jesus name. Amen!

Therefore my friend, do not worry about tomorrow, for tomorrow will worry for itself; each day has enough trouble of its own. (Matt 6:34) This Passing Day. May this passing day honor our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ and be a blessing to you and everyone you meet. Find a stranger and say hello. Don't let another day pass without your day blessing someone else.


If you have a special prayer request, please send your request to "This Passing Day!"


<thispassingday@gmail.com> From Beech Springs, God bless you for Jesus sake.

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