New tracks?

(06.07.21 – Burn Out -Haggai 1:5-11)


My friend, may I ask you a question? Sometimes, due to life's pressures, it's easy to find ourselves lost in the cares of the day. The same experience as when we are driving and don't remember how we got to where we were going?


My friend, Life’s a story, welcome to This Passing Day. I'm M. Clifford Brunner.


Did you ever go through the day and then look back on it and not remember much? Zombie-like, you plodded into work and back again, burned-out, sort of numb. Burnout is nature's way of telling us, we've been going through the motions but our spirit has departed; like a zombie, we leave behind tracks but they lead in two directions–back and forth. Sometimes, due to life's pressures and responsibilities, it's easy to find ourselves lost in the cares of the day. It's happened to all of us. The same experience as when we are driving and don't remember how we got to where we were going? That's the sort of thing that happens to us when we stop focusing on what we're doing because what we're doing is stressful. In a way, it's nature's way of minimizing stress. Nonetheless, it's no way to go through life.


Here's a story: Architect Frank Lloyd Wright once told of an incident that had a profound influence on him. The winter he was nine, he went walking across a snow-covered field with his reserved, no-nonsense uncle. As the two of them reached the far end of the field, his uncle stopped him. He pointed out his own tracks in the snow, straight and true as an arrow's flight, and then young Frank's tracks meandering all over the field. "Notice how your tracks wander aimlessly from the fence to the cattle to the woods and back again," his uncle said. "And see how my tracks aim directly to my goal. There is an important lesson in that." Years later the world-famous architect liked to tell how this experience had greatly contributed to his philosophy in life. "I determined right then," he'd say with a twinkle in his eye, "not to miss most things in life, as my uncle had." (Focus on the Family letter, September, 1992, p. 14.)


At the end of the day do you feel that life has gotten by you and you didn't even see it pass? Perhaps it's an empty sort of feeling; one that lingers into dinner and then pesters all the way until your head hits the pillow. You're a hard worker and feel that y