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No rust?

(06.30.21– Jesus Are You OK? –Matthew 5:34)



My friend, may I ask you a question? Do you guard your words? When you are speaking, what authenticates what you say in the eyes of others? Unfortunately, could it be for many of us that some feel that cursing and swearing is the best way of authenticating what we say?


My friend, Life’s a story, welcome to This Passing Day. I'm M. Clifford Brunner.


I collect automobile license plates; have for years. I have an authentic issue of every Wisconsin automobile license plate from 1912 through 1980. When I was a little boy my Dad would sometimes give me an expired plate from his car. In those days plates changed at least every two years, so I had several that I hung onto over the years. I completed the collection within the last few years but made every effort to find only "authentic" plates. I wanted plates that hadn't been repainted or were reproductions. They had to be originals, so original paint and a little bit of rust was the norm.


Being careful about authenticity when collecting anything is important. But, how about our words? What authenticates what we say in the eyes of others? Unfortunately, some feel that cursing and swearing authenticate meaning these days.


Here's a few thoughts about swearing and authenticity: According to Online News®, "lately, the White House has had quite the potty mouth. Cursing has seemingly become an acceptable mode of communication. There's an unusually high naughty word count states one Politico who also argues that four-letter words are 'one of the signifiers of authenticity,' and that including them gives readers and listeners a better understanding of the person;' but how about another more tender part of our culture? A children's' book author states; "I'm writing a book aimed at 12-15 year olds. One of the characters swears–it's part of her character, sets her apart from the others. It's her own way of declaring herself to be more grown-up than her friends . . . Far more annoying than swear words, in my opinion, is sloppy English. Writers today are told: "make your characters talk the way kids really talk, even if it's incorrect–that's authentic."(LibraryThing.com)


Jesus tells us in the Gospel of Matthew that, "But I tell you, Do not swear at all . . . Simply let your 'Yes' be 'Yes,' and 'No,' 'No'; anything beyond this comes from the evil one" (Matthew 5:34-37). God has put you and I on earth for one reason: to proclaim the Good News of salvation in Christ Jesus our Lord. Pretty simple. Now, how can we do that authentically? We can follow the Savior's will and keep our "Yes," "Yes," and our "No," "No." That's what I find fascinating about Jesus. He never complicates anything; he leaves that up to us, and our sinful nature. Your words and mine are authenticated by our smiles and the love of the Savior reflected in our eyes. There is no need for emphasis by cursing or swearing. Unlike collector's license plates, authentic Christians are known by their repainted surfaces and lack of worldly rust. Jesus redid us long ago. He cleaned us up. A clean mouth is a key part of our character that sets us apart from a foul-mouthed world and makes us "collectibles" in God's eyes.

We pray. Heavenly Father, Help us to keep our "Yes," "Yes," and our "No," "No." Jesus leaves that up to us, and our sinful nature. May we never let Him down. Our words are authenticated by our smiles and the love of the Savior reflected in our eyes, not by cursing. You have taught us in Your Word that there is no need for emphasis by cursing or swearing. May others always see us as authentic Christians, known by our clean mouths and our dirty language. Jesus cleaned us up long ago and a clean mouth is a key part of our character that sets us apart from a foul-mouthed world, making us "collectibles" in Your eyes. In Jesus name we pray. Amen!


Therefore my friend, do not worry about tomorrow, for tomorrow will worry for itself; each day has enough trouble of its own. (Matt 6:34) This Passing Day. May this passing day honor our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ and be a blessing to you and everyone you meet. Find a stranger and say hello. Don't let another day pass without your day blessing someone else.


If you have a special prayer request, please send your request to ”This Passing Day!”

<thispassingday@gmail.com> From Beech Springs, God bless you for Jesus sake.

Comentários


No rust?

(06.30.21– Jesus Are You OK? –Matthew 5:34)



My friend, may I ask you a question? Do you guard your words? When you are speaking, what authenticates what you say in the eyes of others? Unfortunately, could it be for many of us that some feel that cursing and swearing is the best way of authenticating what we say?


My friend, Life’s a story, welcome to This Passing Day. I'm M. Clifford Brunner.


I collect automobile license plates; have for years. I have an authentic issue of every Wisconsin automobile license plate from 1912 through 1980. When I was a little boy my Dad would sometimes give me an expired plate from his car. In those days plates changed at least every two years, so I had several that I hung onto over the years. I completed the collection within the last few years but made every effort to find only "authentic" plates. I wanted plates that hadn't been repainted or were reproductions. They had to be originals, so original paint and a little bit of rust was the norm.


Being careful about authenticity when collecting anything is important. But, how about our words? What authenticates what we say in the eyes of others? Unfortunately, some feel that cursing and swearing authenticate meaning these days.


Here's a few thoughts about swearing and authenticity: According to Online News®, "lately, the White House has had quite the potty mouth. Cursing has seemingly become an acceptable mode of communication. There's an unusually high naughty word count states one Politico who also argues that four-letter words are 'one of the signifiers of authenticity,' and that including them gives readers and listeners a better understanding of the person;' but how about another more tender part of our culture? A children's' book author states; "I'm writing a book aimed at 12-15 year olds. One of the characters swears–it's part of her character, sets her apart from the others. It's her own way of declaring herself to be more grown-up than her friends . . . Far more annoying than swear words, in my opinion, is sloppy English. Writers today are told: "make your characters talk the way kids really talk, even if it's incorrect–that's authentic."(LibraryThing.com)


Jesus tells us in the Gospel of Matthew that, "But I tell you, Do not swear at all . . . Simply let your 'Yes' be 'Yes,' and 'No,' 'No'; anything beyond this comes from the evil one" (Matthew 5:34-37). God has put you and I on earth for one reason: to proclaim the Good News of salvation in Christ Jesus our Lord. Pretty simple. Now, how can we do that authentically? We can follow the Savior's will and keep our "Yes," "Yes," and our "No," "No." That's what I find fascinating about Jesus. He never complicates anything; he leaves that up to us, and our sinful nature. Your words and mine are authenticated by our smiles and the love of the Savior reflected in our eyes. There is no need for emphasis by cursing or swearing. Unlike collector's license plates, authentic Christians are known by their repainted surfaces and lack of worldly rust. Jesus redid us long ago. He cleaned us up. A clean mouth is a key part of our character that sets us apart from a foul-mouthed world and makes us "collectibles" in God's eyes.

We pray. Heavenly Father, Help us to keep our "Yes," "Yes," and our "No," "No." Jesus leaves that up to us, and our sinful nature. May we never let Him down. Our words are authenticated by our smiles and the love of the Savior reflected in our eyes, not by cursing. You have taught us in Your Word that there is no need for emphasis by cursing or swearing. May others always see us as authentic Christians, known by our clean mouths and our dirty language. Jesus cleaned us up long ago and a clean mouth is a key part of our character that sets us apart from a foul-mouthed world, making us "collectibles" in Your eyes. In Jesus name we pray. Amen!


Therefore my friend, do not worry about tomorrow, for tomorrow will worry for itself; each day has enough trouble of its own. (Matt 6:34) This Passing Day. May this passing day honor our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ and be a blessing to you and everyone you meet. Find a stranger and say hello. Don't let another day pass without your day blessing someone else.


If you have a special prayer request, please send your request to ”This Passing Day!”

<thispassingday@gmail.com> From Beech Springs, God bless you for Jesus sake.

Comentários


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