top of page

Numbers game?

Numbers game? (11.12.21– Good Endings! –Ephesians 4: 1-16)


My friend, may I ask you a question? When you fall into a mistake will you won't find others anxious to drop by and share in the aloneness?

My friend, Life’s a story, welcome to This Passing Day.

I'm M. Clifford Brunner.



When things go wrong, wrong in a big way, doesn't always seem to hit when you least expect it? Unprepared for the onslaught, we are quickly thrust into a position of "Now what am I supposed to do?" Perhaps the worst thing about failure is the terrible sense of loneliness it engenders; especially at the outset; the period when the realization of failure is freshest and the specter of aloneness is strongest. Making a mistake, big or small, tends to do that to a person. There is nothing that isolates more rapidly or more securely than error. When you fall into it you won't find a lot of other people anxious to drop by and share in the aloneness. No, mistakes seem very singular. They tend to own the person who makes them and are very hard to shake.

Here's a story: In the early 1950's Ford Motor Company conceived of a car that would give the average person luxury and power without the high price tag. The car would be spacious with room for seven passengers. It would be powered by a V-8 engine; but, since constructed of aluminum and other light-weight alloys, it would cost less to produce. It was to be a car for people who wanted to own a Cadillac but could only afford a Chevy. Soon Ford dealerships around the country began clamoring for the new, 1957 Edsel. Edsel turned out to be one of the biggest, if not the biggest failure, in auto- motive history. The car was an abysmal failure almost from the start. Headlights wouldn't work, horn buttons got jammed, roofs leaked, and pieces of trim fell off the car. Rust was a problem as well. And, worst of all, the automatic transmissions worked poorly. The car was a lemon and Ford phased it out in 1960. In the years following the Edsel disaster, Ford stumbled a bit, but was able to recover economically and put the mistake behind it. How did they do it? Edsel was just part of a team of cars that Ford introduced during that same period. Other models like Galaxie, Comet, Falcon, Ranchero, and eventually Mustang stepped into the gap and pulled Ford back into the industry leader it had always been.


When we stumble and fall into a mistake, it's easy to think that it's over; especially when we sense that we are all alone in that error. And, if we truly were alone, that would probably be the case. Christians, however, are never alone in their mistakes. The reason is because we are all part of one body, the body of Christ, which is comprised of many others who can step in for us when things go wrong and fill the gap. United in purpose and love for one another, even dreadful mistakes can be accounted for and overcome. When we make a mistake, even an Edsel-like stumble, we can rest assured that as part of a "full line of Christian models," there is strength in numbers. Our stumble will never leave us alone.

We pray. Heavenly Father, when we stumble and fall into a mistake, it's easy to think that it's over; especially when we sense that we are all alone in that error. And, if we truly were alone, that would probably be the case. But we are never alone in our mistakes all part of one body, the body of Christ, will fill in the gap for us. United in purpose and love for one another, even dreadful mistakes can be accounted for and overcome when we have brothers and sisters in Christ who care, because You cared for us. In Jesus name we pray. Amen!


Therefore my friend, do not worry about tomorrow, for tomorrow will worry for itself; each day has enough trouble of its own. (Matt 6:34) This Passing Day. May this passing day honor our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ and be a blessing to you and everyone you meet. Find a stranger and say hello. Don't let another day pass without your day blessing someone else.

If you have a special prayer request, please send your request to ”This Passing Day!”


<thispassingday@gmail.com> From Beech Springs, God bless you for Jesus sake.

Kommentare


Numbers game?

Numbers game? (11.12.21– Good Endings! –Ephesians 4: 1-16)


My friend, may I ask you a question? When you fall into a mistake will you won't find others anxious to drop by and share in the aloneness?

My friend, Life’s a story, welcome to This Passing Day.

I'm M. Clifford Brunner.



When things go wrong, wrong in a big way, doesn't always seem to hit when you least expect it? Unprepared for the onslaught, we are quickly thrust into a position of "Now what am I supposed to do?" Perhaps the worst thing about failure is the terrible sense of loneliness it engenders; especially at the outset; the period when the realization of failure is freshest and the specter of aloneness is strongest. Making a mistake, big or small, tends to do that to a person. There is nothing that isolates more rapidly or more securely than error. When you fall into it you won't find a lot of other people anxious to drop by and share in the aloneness. No, mistakes seem very singular. They tend to own the person who makes them and are very hard to shake.

Here's a story: In the early 1950's Ford Motor Company conceived of a car that would give the average person luxury and power without the high price tag. The car would be spacious with room for seven passengers. It would be powered by a V-8 engine; but, since constructed of aluminum and other light-weight alloys, it would cost less to produce. It was to be a car for people who wanted to own a Cadillac but could only afford a Chevy. Soon Ford dealerships around the country began clamoring for the new, 1957 Edsel. Edsel turned out to be one of the biggest, if not the biggest failure, in auto- motive history. The car was an abysmal failure almost from the start. Headlights wouldn't work, horn buttons got jammed, roofs leaked, and pieces of trim fell off the car. Rust was a problem as well. And, worst of all, the automatic transmissions worked poorly. The car was a lemon and Ford phased it out in 1960. In the years following the Edsel disaster, Ford stumbled a bit, but was able to recover economically and put the mistake behind it. How did they do it? Edsel was just part of a team of cars that Ford introduced during that same period. Other models like Galaxie, Comet, Falcon, Ranchero, and eventually Mustang stepped into the gap and pulled Ford back into the industry leader it had always been.


When we stumble and fall into a mistake, it's easy to think that it's over; especially when we sense that we are all alone in that error. And, if we truly were alone, that would probably be the case. Christians, however, are never alone in their mistakes. The reason is because we are all part of one body, the body of Christ, which is comprised of many others who can step in for us when things go wrong and fill the gap. United in purpose and love for one another, even dreadful mistakes can be accounted for and overcome. When we make a mistake, even an Edsel-like stumble, we can rest assured that as part of a "full line of Christian models," there is strength in numbers. Our stumble will never leave us alone.

We pray. Heavenly Father, when we stumble and fall into a mistake, it's easy to think that it's over; especially when we sense that we are all alone in that error. And, if we truly were alone, that would probably be the case. But we are never alone in our mistakes all part of one body, the body of Christ, will fill in the gap for us. United in purpose and love for one another, even dreadful mistakes can be accounted for and overcome when we have brothers and sisters in Christ who care, because You cared for us. In Jesus name we pray. Amen!


Therefore my friend, do not worry about tomorrow, for tomorrow will worry for itself; each day has enough trouble of its own. (Matt 6:34) This Passing Day. May this passing day honor our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ and be a blessing to you and everyone you meet. Find a stranger and say hello. Don't let another day pass without your day blessing someone else.

If you have a special prayer request, please send your request to ”This Passing Day!”


<thispassingday@gmail.com> From Beech Springs, God bless you for Jesus sake.

Kommentare


bottom of page