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Positively?

(07.16.21– Secret To Happy Living! –Acts 2:28)


My friend, may I ask you a question? Is it true that people who succeed in life tend to have a great sense of humor that always errors on the positive side. Seriously, how does it get them through the tough times?


My friend, Life’s a story, welcome to This Passing Day.

I'm M. Clifford Brunner.


"No!" Ask any of my children, now long departed from Beech Springs, and they will tell you that little two-letter word was one of my favorites whenever they wanted something and dropped it on me in an unplanned manner. "Dad, can I stay out later than 11:00 tonight?" You could be pretty sure that the answer was an automatic "no!" I didn't need to think about it or even weigh the good and the bad. "No" was quick and easy and fit every situation pretty well. I learned from the best: my Dad. He was rather fond of using "no" as well. In fact, he put a real twist on it. He would interject his "no" bomb even before we got our "want" petition out. That way he was covered no matter what. I know that it was just his sense of humor and I remember that in most things he was a pretty easy touch. But, that little word "no" could really turn any situation into a negative pretty fast. Even though both my Dad and I thought we were being funny when we said it, "no" isn't funny and has little to do with keeping things positive or having a sense of humor.


Here's a story: She was a homemaker who became a nationally known author, speaker, and syndicated columnist with a sense of humor. A woman who could write that way must have had an easy life? Wrong. Erma Bombeck's father died when she was only nine years old. At 20 she was found to have a hereditary kidney disorder that would eventually lead to kidney failure. In 1991 she had breast cancer and underwent a mastectomy. In 1993 she started four-times-a-day peritoneal dialysis until a kidney transplant. Complications from the transplant finally took her life. When fans wrote to say, "Things like this shouldn't happen to you," she had an answer. "Why not me?" she said. "I had a good long ride with it. I have written all these books with kidney problems. It doesn't affect your brain. It doesn't affect your sense of humor." I suspect her sense of humor was a coping device. It helped her deal with her pain. It kept her from getting brittle and grumpy. It helped her live 69 years in a positive rather than negative way, with joy rather than self-pity. (Rubel Shelly)

People who succeed with life tend to have a great sense of humor that always errors on the positive side. It gets them through the tough times. They use their humor to diffuse, uplift and push through tough times. Remember when Ronald Reagan was shot in 1981? “Honey, I forgot to duck,” he told Nancy at the hospital. To the surgeons about to operate on him, he said, “Please tell me you are Republicans.” A sense of humor, however, never has anything to do with being funny at someone else's expense. The next time you’re tempted to take a positive situation and turn it negative, remember this: “no” is easy and “yes” may be hard but the reward of saying “yes” at the right times makes it worth the effort.

We pray. Heavenly Father, we are often tempted to inject our brand of humor into the conversation for the sake of pride, thoughtlessness and just plain ignorance. Forgive us when we do this at the expense of someone else’s feelings. Help us by Your Spirit Lord to always think before we inject a funny line or comment into our conversation. Remind us that our Savior was always very careful to address others with respect for their feelings and perspectives. Teach us to use our humor in the right way at the right times and in the right company. Help us to keep a positive viewpoint by injecting humor when it is appropriate and beneficial. In Jesus name we pray. Amen!


Therefore my friend, do not worry about tomorrow, for tomorrow will worry for itself; each day has enough trouble of its own. (Matt 6:34) This Passing Day. May this passing day honor our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ and be a blessing to you and everyone you meet. Find a stranger and say hello. Don't let another day pass without your day blessing someone else.


If you have a special prayer request, please send your request to ”This Passing Day!”

<thispassingday@gmail.com> From Beech Springs, God bless you for Jesus sake.


Positively?

(07.16.21– Secret To Happy Living! –Acts 2:28)


My friend, may I ask you a question? Is it true that people who succeed in life tend to have a great sense of humor that always errors on the positive side. Seriously, how does it get them through the tough times?


My friend, Life’s a story, welcome to This Passing Day.

I'm M. Clifford Brunner.


"No!" Ask any of my children, now long departed from Beech Springs, and they will tell you that little two-letter word was one of my favorites whenever they wanted something and dropped it on me in an unplanned manner. "Dad, can I stay out later than 11:00 tonight?" You could be pretty sure that the answer was an automatic "no!" I didn't need to think about it or even weigh the good and the bad. "No" was quick and easy and fit every situation pretty well. I learned from the best: my Dad. He was rather fond of using "no" as well. In fact, he put a real twist on it. He would interject his "no" bomb even before we got our "want" petition out. That way he was covered no matter what. I know that it was just his sense of humor and I remember that in most things he was a pretty easy touch. But, that little word "no" could really turn any situation into a negative pretty fast. Even though both my Dad and I thought we were being funny when we said it, "no" isn't funny and has little to do with keeping things positive or having a sense of humor.


Here's a story: She was a homemaker who became a nationally known author, speaker, and syndicated columnist with a sense of humor. A woman who could write that way must have had an easy life? Wrong. Erma Bombeck's father died when she was only nine years old. At 20 she was found to have a hereditary kidney disorder that would eventually lead to kidney failure. In 1991 she had breast cancer and underwent a mastectomy. In 1993 she started four-times-a-day peritoneal dialysis until a kidney transplant. Complications from the transplant finally took her life. When fans wrote to say, "Things like this shouldn't happen to you," she had an answer. "Why not me?" she said. "I had a good long ride with it. I have written all these books with kidney problems. It doesn't affect your brain. It doesn't affect your sense of humor." I suspect her sense of humor was a coping device. It helped her deal with her pain. It kept her from getting brittle and grumpy. It helped her live 69 years in a positive rather than negative way, with joy rather than self-pity. (Rubel Shelly)

People who succeed with life tend to have a great sense of humor that always errors on the positive side. It gets them through the tough times. They use their humor to diffuse, uplift and push through tough times. Remember when Ronald Reagan was shot in 1981? “Honey, I forgot to duck,” he told Nancy at the hospital. To the surgeons about to operate on him, he said, “Please tell me you are Republicans.” A sense of humor, however, never has anything to do with being funny at someone else's expense. The next time you’re tempted to take a positive situation and turn it negative, remember this: “no” is easy and “yes” may be hard but the reward of saying “yes” at the right times makes it worth the effort.

We pray. Heavenly Father, we are often tempted to inject our brand of humor into the conversation for the sake of pride, thoughtlessness and just plain ignorance. Forgive us when we do this at the expense of someone else’s feelings. Help us by Your Spirit Lord to always think before we inject a funny line or comment into our conversation. Remind us that our Savior was always very careful to address others with respect for their feelings and perspectives. Teach us to use our humor in the right way at the right times and in the right company. Help us to keep a positive viewpoint by injecting humor when it is appropriate and beneficial. In Jesus name we pray. Amen!


Therefore my friend, do not worry about tomorrow, for tomorrow will worry for itself; each day has enough trouble of its own. (Matt 6:34) This Passing Day. May this passing day honor our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ and be a blessing to you and everyone you meet. Find a stranger and say hello. Don't let another day pass without your day blessing someone else.


If you have a special prayer request, please send your request to ”This Passing Day!”

<thispassingday@gmail.com> From Beech Springs, God bless you for Jesus sake.


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