Slaves?

(12.22.21– ’Tis the Season –Matthew 20:20-34)




My friend, may I ask you a question? Although the world had an understanding of what it meant to serve as a slave, did it have no understanding of what it meant to do so out of love?


My friend, Life’s a story, welcome to This Passing Day.

I'm M. Clifford Brunner.




"A willingness to serve." The second great "reason" for Christmas is service. Jesus Christ did not come to be served but to serve. Although as the Lord of Lords He most certainly could have demanded it. No, Jesus came to give new meaning to the word, "service." When He was born on that cold Judean night, He was born into a world that had little understanding of what it meant to "serve one another." It was a dog-eat-dog world under the Romans. The concept of serving was a foreign idea. The Greeks didn't embrace it nor did the other great empires prior to Rome. When King Jesus came into the world, He introduced a brand-new idea, "whoever wants to become great among you must be your servant, and whoever wants to be first must be your slave." Although the world had an understanding of what it meant to serve as a slave, it had no understanding of what it meant to do so out of love. And without Christmas, the world today would still be ignorant of that.


Here's a thought from James Packer: "The Greek word for slave is doulos (bondslave). Sometimes it means diakonos (deacon or minister); and both doulos and diakonos are synonyms. Both words denote a man who is not at