top of page

By the moment?





By the moment? In a critical baseball moment, pitcher Warren Spahn faced bases loaded with one out. He had to strike out the side or induce a double play. With Braves leading by a run, tension was high. Spahn's unconventional move, pausing to pick up a blade of grass, preceded a game-winning double play.   

 

Think about it. Sometimes it takes doing what seems the wrong thing at the right time that makes the difference.


God’s Word tells us: “ At this, Job got up and tore his robe and shaved his head. Then he fell to the ground in worship” (Job 1:20).


In tough situations, we're tempted to resort to various coping mechanisms like worry or blame. Yet, few consider worship amidst adversity. Reflecting on Warren Spahn's moment of contemplation on the field, he was worshipping the moment, making an unconventional but impactful decision. Wrong thing by the book, but it was the right thing by the moment.


We pray. “Heavenly Father, in times of adversity, may we turn to You in worship rather than worry or blame. Help us to see moments of contemplation as opportunities to honor You in these moments.. Guide us to make decisions that may seem unconventional but align with Your will.  In Jesus' name, I pray. Amen.”


“Therefore do not worry about tomorrow, for tomorrow will worry about itself.

Each day has enough trouble of its own” (Matthew 6:34)

Commentaires


By the moment?





By the moment? In a critical baseball moment, pitcher Warren Spahn faced bases loaded with one out. He had to strike out the side or induce a double play. With Braves leading by a run, tension was high. Spahn's unconventional move, pausing to pick up a blade of grass, preceded a game-winning double play.   

 

Think about it. Sometimes it takes doing what seems the wrong thing at the right time that makes the difference.


God’s Word tells us: “ At this, Job got up and tore his robe and shaved his head. Then he fell to the ground in worship” (Job 1:20).


In tough situations, we're tempted to resort to various coping mechanisms like worry or blame. Yet, few consider worship amidst adversity. Reflecting on Warren Spahn's moment of contemplation on the field, he was worshipping the moment, making an unconventional but impactful decision. Wrong thing by the book, but it was the right thing by the moment.


We pray. “Heavenly Father, in times of adversity, may we turn to You in worship rather than worry or blame. Help us to see moments of contemplation as opportunities to honor You in these moments.. Guide us to make decisions that may seem unconventional but align with Your will.  In Jesus' name, I pray. Amen.”


“Therefore do not worry about tomorrow, for tomorrow will worry about itself.

Each day has enough trouble of its own” (Matthew 6:34)

Commentaires


bottom of page