Put it down?

(05.05.21 – Choices in Life -Matthew 16:26)




My friend, may I ask you a question? When it comes to smart choices, sometimes waiting things out, gives them time to settle. But, is it better to know when the waiting needs to end and the starting begins?


My friend, Life’s a story, welcome to This Passing Day.

I'm M. Clifford Brunner.



When it comes to smart choices, sometimes waiting things out, gives them time to settle. Deciding is: knowing when the waiting needs to end and the starting begins. A number of years ago I had the task of building a banister for the stairway going down into our basement recreation room. Now banisters, complete with railing, insets and base plates, have a lot of angles and cuts to consider. Simply, the geometry and precision required of building that banister far outweighed the simple measuring and cutting of most carpentry tasks around here at Beech Springs. This banister would not be just a simple rail affair. Rather, it would have to fill the space between steps and ceiling so as to prevent little grandkids from falling over the side of the stairway. I spent the first several days simply staring at the empty stair space and scribbling little drawings on a pad of paper. The planning was necessary. But, the more planning I put into it, the more the task seemed to grow. Finally, I knew that I had to leave the pad of paper behind and begin making some honest sawing, gluing and fitting. As daunting as the task seemed, I knew deep down planning had to give way to construction.


Here's a story: "A man, who had trouble with his eyes went to see his doctor. After a thorough examination the doctor told the man that he was losing his eyesight and that eventually he would go completely blind. The doctor advised that the man have an operation to restore his eyesight. With resignation the man agreed and the operation was done. When the man awoke from the operation he was amazed that his sight was nearly perfect. He could see well even without glasses. Unfortunately it soon became apparent that, although his eyesight was restored, now his memory had been affected. He could remember anything from his pa