Your canoe?

02.15.21—Rich Man/Poor Man!--James 4:4-6


My friend, may I ask you a question? How big is your life? Did you ever ask yourself that question? Simply, if you did an accounting of all that you own today, would it fit into the life God has asked you to live?


My friend, life’s a story, welcome to This Passing Day.

I’m M. Clifford Brunner




How big is your life? Did you ever ask yourself that question? Simply, if you did an accounting of all that you own today, would it fit into the life God has asked you to live?


Here’s a story: A young Chippewa woman grew tired of her life in the big city. She decided to return to the reservation since life was simpler there. She began to pack her belongings--box after box until they almost reached the ceiling. She could almost see the envious looks of her friends on the reservation! That night she dreamed she had arrived on the banks of the river with her big pile of boxes spread around her. There she waited for her brother, who would bring a canoe for her journey home. When her brother arrived he seemed surprised at her pile of belongings. He went to work, carefully loading box after box into the canoe until it was nearly full. But the stack of boxes on the shore seemed no smaller. “Why didn’t you bring a bigger canoe?” she cried. Her brother answered quietly, “It’s the biggest canoe on the reservation. Then the young Indian woman remembered something her grandmother had once told her: “Remember, if you have more things to move than can fill one canoe, then you will know that you have become greedy. You will have taken more than your share, and others will not have enough. Don’t let that happen to you, my granddaughter.” When the young woman woke up she found herself crying tears of shame. She had become greedy.


How full is your canoe today? Is it heavily laden with little more that could be forced or jammed into it? Or, perhaps, like that young woman, your canoe is full and there is still much more to be added. When a Chippewa brave moved his family from one camp to another, it was his custom to take no more with him that what could fit into his canoe. Since many things in the village were owned communally, an over-filled canoe for one left less for those he had left behind. God has richly blessed you and I with much; much more than we truly need. But, in our pride, we often go about collect- ing more without regard for those whose canoes are pretty empty. As you and I go about loading our canoes today, it would be a good thing to look around us and see what is necessary and what might fit nicely in someone else’s canoe.


We pray. Heavenly Father. My canoe is full today. Is it heavily laden with the many blessings that You have bestowed upon me Your child. There is no reason for more to be added. Lord, let me take no more with me into my daily life than that which could fit into my blessed canoe. Give me the peace of mind and the thankful heart to give to others who might have been left behind in the success of my life. You have richly blessed me with much; much more than I truly need. Forgive me for the times when I am selfish and greedy. Give me a thankful and giving heart. As I go about loading my canoe today, it would be a good thing to look around and see what is necessary and what might fit nicely in someone else’s canoe. I pray this in Jesus name. Amen!

Therefore my friend, do not worry about tomorrow, for tomorrow will worry for itself; each day has enough trouble of its own. (Matt 6:34) This Passing Day. May this passing day honor our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ and be a blessing to you and everyone you meet. Find a stranger and say hello. Don't let another day pass without your day blessing someone else.


If you have a special prayer request, please send your request to "This Passing Day!"


<thispassingday@gmail.com> From Beech Springs, God bless you for Jesus sake.

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